Video

Video: Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis – (6th Installment – Economic Inequities)

Here’s the video for the sixth session, held on April 28th, focusing on economic inequities. The discussion was moderated by:

The Panelists were:

The Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis series of zoom webinars is hosted by the Systemic Justice Project on on Tuesdays from 12-1pm EST.

Click here for more information about the webinar series.

Video: Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis – (5th Installment – Criminal Legal System)

Here’s the video for the fifth session, held on April 21st, focusing on the Criminal Legal System. The discussion was moderated by Jon Hanson and Jacob Lipton, Co-Directors of the Systemic Justice Project. The Panelists were:

The Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis series of zoom webinars is hosted by the Systemic Justice Project on on Tuesdays from 12-1pm EST.

Click here for more information about the webinar series.

Video: Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis – (4th Installment – Immigration)

Here’s the video for the fourth session, held on April 14th, focusing on Immigration. The discussion was moderated by Jon Hanson and Jacob Lipton, Co-Directors of the Systemic Justice Project. The Panelists were:

The Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis series of zoom webinars is hosted by the Systemic Justice Project on on Tuesdays from 12-1pm EST.

Click here for more information about the webinar series.

Video: Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis – (3rd Installment – Decarceration)

Here’s the video for the third session, held on April 8th, focusing on Decareration. The discussion was moderated by Harvard Law Students, Connie Cho and Rio Sharf. The Panelists were:

The “Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis” series of zoom webinars is hosted by the Systemic Justice Project on on Tuesdays from 12-1pm EST.

Click here for more information about the webinar series.

Video: Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis – Webinar Two

The video for the second session, held on April 7th, is now available, featuring:

Here’s the video:

 

 

This is the second in a series of zoom webinars, hosted by the Systemic Justice Project on “Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis” on Tuesdays from 12-1pm EST.

Click here for more information about the webinar series 

Kimberlé Crenshaw at Harvard Law School

On February 12 and 13, 2015, Professor Crenshaw made three outstanding, public presentations at Harvard Law School — at events organized by Harvard Law School’s Students for Inclusion.  All three talks are compiled talks in this video.

In the first talk, Professor Crenshaw tells several “war stories” from her time as a students at Harvard Law School, following the 1981 departure of Professor Derrick Bell. She describes the efforts she and her classmates made to fill that curricular gap, the failure of the HLS administration to fill that gap in a way that satisfied student demands, and the protests and curricular creativity that followed.  She discusses what that experience revealed about Harvard Law School, legal theory, and law at the time, what the students learned about creating an intellectual project, and how those experiences and lessons marked the beginning of Critical Race Theory.

In the second talk, Professor Crenshaw discusses the role of race in conventional legal pedagogy and what her efforts to create a different sort of classroom dynamic looks like.

In the third talk, Professor Crenshaw speaks about the important role of student activism in elite legal institutions like Harvard Law School — particularly in a moment when racial injustice is as salient as it is now.  She also discusses “how we got here” to a “post-post-racial moment” and about what might be learned from previous struggles about how to go forward in the struggle for racial justice.

Noam Chomsky on “Hume’s Maxim and the Engineering of Consent”

From the 2013 Harvard Law School Conference,”Deep Capture: Psychology, Public Relations, Democracy, and Law.”

Hume’s Maxim:

“Nothing appears more surprising to those who consider human affairs with a philosophical eye, than the easiness with which the many are governed by the few; and the implicit submission, with which men resign their own sentiments and passions to those of their rulers. When we enquire by what means this wonder is effected, we shall find, that, as Force is always on the side of the governed, the governors have nothing to support them but opinion. It is, therefore, on opinion only that government is founded; and this maxim extends to the most despotic and most military governments, as well as to the most free and most popular.”

Keynotes by Professors Gary Peller & Kimberlé Crenshaw

February 13, 2015 – at Harvard Law School – Students for Inclusion Event (“Law School Matters: Reassessing Legal Education Post-Ferguson” Conference).  The title of this event, featuring keynote presentations by Professors Peller and Crenshaw, was “Law School or Justice School: How what we learn in Wassertein/Casperson relates to Ferguson.”

“Race and Social Movement at Harvard Law School: A Retrospective”

[youtube:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zORE_u00rg0&feature=youtu.be%5D

February 12, 2015 – at Harvard Law School – Students for Inclusion Event (“Law School Matters: Reassessing Legal Education Post-Ferguson” Conference) speakers include Dan Coquillette, Kim Crenshaw, Phil Lee, and Victoria White-Mason