Law

Systemic Lawyering Webinar #8 – Focus on Domestic Violence

Join this week’s “Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis” Webinar at:  https://harvard.zoom.us/j/770662864.  

This week’s session, Tuesday May 12 at 12pm EST, focuses on domestic violence and features the following panelists:

  • Stephanie Davidson, UCLA Law School
  • Christine Perumal, Safe Horizon Domestic Violence Law Project
  • Jessica Spector, Safe Horizon Domestic Violence Law Project

The series features systemically oriented lawyers and activists in fields most affected by our latest crisis. Each session examines the special challenges posed by the crisis, the pressing needs, the new opportunities, and the more general lessons for lawyers, law students, and others committed to promoting systemic change.

For more details about the series, including links to videos of previous sessions, see https://systemicjusticeblog.wordpress.com/2020/03/29/systemic-lawyering-webinar-series/

Click here to join the webinars via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/770662864.

Video: Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis – (6th Installment – Economic Inequities)

Here’s the video for the sixth session, held on April 28th, focusing on economic inequities. The discussion was moderated by:

The Panelists were:

The Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis series of zoom webinars is hosted by the Systemic Justice Project on on Tuesdays from 12-1pm EST.

Click here for more information about the webinar series.

Video: Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis – (5th Installment – Criminal Legal System)

Here’s the video for the fifth session, held on April 21st, focusing on the Criminal Legal System. The discussion was moderated by Jon Hanson and Jacob Lipton, Co-Directors of the Systemic Justice Project. The Panelists were:

The Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis series of zoom webinars is hosted by the Systemic Justice Project on on Tuesdays from 12-1pm EST.

Click here for more information about the webinar series.

Systemic Lawyering Webinar #6 – Focus on Economic Inequities

Session 6 Systemic Lawyering Webinar 042820

Join this week’s “Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis” Webinar at:  https://harvard.zoom.us/j/770662864.  

This week’s session (Tuesday, April 28, at 12pm EST) will focus on economic inequity in the time of COVID-19. Participants include:

Moderators:

The series features systemically oriented lawyers and activists in fields most affected by our latest crisis. Each session examines the special challenges posed by the crisis, the pressing needs, the new opportunities, and the more general lessons for lawyers, law students, and others committed to promoting systemic change.

For more details about the series, including links to videos of previous sessions, see https://systemicjusticeblog.wordpress.com/2020/03/29/systemic-lawyering-webinar-series/

You can find a list of previous sessions and links to videos here

If you are a law student looking for ways to pitch in right away: https://www.peoplesparity.org/coronavirus/.

For information about the COVID-19 Rapid Reaction/Systems Summer Institute, go here.

Click here to join the webinars via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/770662864.

Systemic Lawyering Webinar #5 – Focus on Criminal Legal System

Session 5 Systemic Lawyering Webinar 042120

Join this week’s “Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis” Webinar at:  https://harvard.zoom.us/j/770662864.  

This week’s session, Tuesday April 14 at 12pm EST, focuses on the criminal legal system and features the following panelists:

The series features systemically oriented lawyers and activists in fields most affected by our latest crisis. Each session examines the special challenges posed by the crisis, the pressing needs, the new opportunities, and the more general lessons for lawyers, law students, and others committed to promoting systemic change.

For more details about the series, including links to videos of previous sessions, see https://systemicjusticeblog.wordpress.com/2020/03/29/systemic-lawyering-webinar-series/

You can find a list of previous sessions and links to videos here

If you are a law student looking for ways to pitch in: https://www.peoplesparity.org/coronavirus/

Click here to join the webinars via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/770662864.

Systemic Lawyering Webinar #4 – Focus on Immigration

Copy of Systemic Lawyering Series Flyer

This week the “Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis” Webinar Tuesday April 14 at 12pm EST, will focus on immigration.

Join at:  https://harvard.zoom.us/j/770662864. 

This week’s session, Tuesday April 14 at 12pm EST, focuses on immigration and features the following panelists:

Next week’s session, Tuesday, April 21, at 12pm EST, will focus on the criminal legal system and feature:

The series features systemically oriented lawyers and activists in fields most affected by our latest crisis. Each session examines the special challenges posed by the crisis, the pressing needs, the new opportunities, and the more general lessons for lawyers, law students, and others committed to promoting systemic change.

For more details about the series, including links to videos of previous sessions, see https://systemicjusticeblog.wordpress.com/2020/03/29/systemic-lawyering-webinar-series/

You can watch one of last week’s webinars, featuring Esme Caramello, Joey Longley, and Derecka Purnell here.

If you are a law student looking for ways to pitch in: https://www.peoplesparity.org/coronavirus/

Click here to join the webinars via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/770662864.

Systemic Lawyering Series – Week 2

Flyer for Session #2

This week there will be two sessions of the “Systemic Lawyering in Times of Crisis” Webinar,  both available at:  https://harvard.zoom.us/j/770662864. The series features systemically oriented lawyers and activists in fields most affected by our latest crisisEach session examines the special challenges posed by the crisis, the pressing needs, the new opportunities, and the more general lessons for lawyers, law students, and others committed to promoting systemic change. 

On Tuesday April 7 at 12pm EST, the webinar will feature: 

On Wednesday April 8 at 5pm EST, there will be a special session on decarceration hosted by students from the Justice Lab featuring: 

For full details, see https://systemicjusticeblog.wordpress.com/2020/03/29/systemic-lawyering-webinar-series/ 

Watch last week’s webinar, featuring Sabi Ardalan, Matthew Duffy, Jane Flanagan, and Andrea Sáenz at: https://systemicjusticeblog.wordpress.com/2020/04/06/systemic-lawyering-in-times-of-crisis-webinar-one/ 

If you are a law student wanting to pitch in, visit: https://www.peoplesparity.org/coronavirus/ 

Click here to join the webinars via Zoom: https://harvard.zoom.us/j/770662864. 

Historic Settlement in Jennings

Great news from two friends of the Systemic Justice Project:

A small city bordering Ferguson, Mo., has agreed to pay $4.7 million to compensate nearly 2,000 people who spent time in the city’s jail for not paying fines and fees related to traffic and other relatively petty violations.

Alec explains the systemic place of this litigation:

“This historic settlement is part of a national movement to change how indifferent we’ve become to putting human beings in cages, and to end the notion that courts can be used as tools of revenue generation rather than places of justice,” said Alec Karakatsanis, whose Washington-based nonprofit organization, Equal Justice Under Law, brought the suit with the Arch City Defenders, a Missouri nonprofit group, and the St. Louis University School of Law.

See the full New York Times story here.

Spotlight and Systemic Journalism

Newspaper-clipart-10

Christopher Benson has written a great piece on Spotlight and the problems with an individualistic, rather than a systemic, focus:

[M]erely exposing individual wrongdoers does not go far enough if systemic flaws enable wrongdoing to continue.

That is the driving dramatic question for the movie and the emerging motivation for the Globe journalists.

Even more, though, it is a compelling challenge for the journalism profession on matters of race. Too often, we are content to frame stories about racial conflict as individual problems and not as institutional ones.

College campus tension, excessive police force, even racial political pandering are all framed as anomalies, problems caused by misguided individuals. As with “Spotlight,” that frame excludes what should be our real focus. As a result, we wind up missing a critical realization: We just might be part of the system we are “going after.”

Benson references instances of System Justification Theory, writing:

This is not a left-right bias, or even necessarily a black-white bias. This bias can spring from something seemingly benign — a belief that the system is fundamentally sound. People tend to believe problems only arise when individuals abuse the system. There is an unquestioned belief in the rightness of our institutions.

This tension between targeting bad individuals and focusing on systems is summarized in this dialogue, which Benson quotes:

Baron: “We need to focus on the institution, not the individual priests. Practice and policy …”
Bradlee: “Sounds like we’re going after (Cardinal Bernard Francis) Law.”
Baron: “We’re going after the system.”

I highly recommend reading the full piece, which has as many lessons for law and legal education as it does for journalism, here.