For-Profit Colleges

Lower Ed: The Troubling Rise of For-Profit Colleges in the New Economy

Exciting event/webcast at the Berkman Klein Center tomorrow, connected to the Justice Lab paper on the American Student Debt Crisis, with a focus on for-profit colleges:

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More than two million students are enrolled in for-profit colleges, from the small family-run operations to the behemoths brandished on billboards, subway ads, and late-night commercials. In Lower Ed Tressie McMillan Cottom parses the fraught dynamics of this big-money industry to show how it is part and parcel of the growing inequality plaguing the country today. McMillan Cottom discloses the shrewd recruitment and marketing strategies that these schools deploy and explains how, despite the well-documented predatory practices of some and the campus closings of others, ending for-profit colleges won’t end the vulnerabilities that made them the fastest growing sector of higher education at the turn of the twenty-first century. 

Drawing on more than one hundred interviews with students, employees, executives, and activists, Lower Ed tells the story of the benefits, pitfalls, and real costs of a for-profit education. It is a story about broken social contracts; about education transforming from a public interest to a private gain; and about all Americans and the challenges we face in our divided, unequal society.

Friday, June 23, 2016 at 12:00 pm
Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University
Harvard Law School campus
Wasserstein Hall, Room 1010
RSVP required to attend in person
Event will be live webcast at 12:00 pm

 

Radio Boston Looks at For-Profit Colleges

500px-Mortarboard.svgYesterday, Toby Merrill, attorney and senior clinical fellow at the predatory lending practice at the legal services center of Harvard Law School. was one of the two guests interviewed on Radio Boston to discuss important questions being asked bout for-profit colleges in Massachusetts regarding new regulations and lawsuits. “The state attorney general is investigating about 12 of them — amid charges of low graduation rates and deceptive sales tactics that leave too many students mired in debt.”  Listen here.